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Impact Factor

Journal Impact Factor

The journal Impact Factor is the average number of times articles from the journal published in the past two years have been cited in the JCR year.

The Impact Factor is calculated by dividing the number of citations in the JCR year by the total number of articles published in the two previous years. An Impact Factor of 1.0 means that, on average, the articles published one or two year ago have been cited one time. An Impact Factor of 2.5 means that, on average, the articles published one or two year ago have been cited two and a half times. The citing works may be articles published in the same journal. However, most citing works are from different journals, proceedings, or books indexed by Web of Science.


5-Year Journal Impact Factor

The 5-year journal Impact Factor is the average number of times articles from the journal published in the past five years have been cited in the JCR year. It is caclulated by dividing the number of citations in the JCR year by the total number of articles published in the five previous years.

Note The 5-year Impact Factor is available only in JCR 2007 and subsequent years. You may calculate the 5-year Impact Factor using an earlier JCR year as a starting point by following these instructions.


Aggregate Impact Factor

The aggregate Impact Factor for a subject category is calculated the same way as the Impact Factor for a journal, but it takes into account the number of citations to all journals in the category and the number of articles from all journals in the category. An aggregate Impact Factor of 1.0 means that that, on average, the articles in the subject category published one or two years ago have been cited one time. The median Impact Factor is the median value of all journal Impact Factors in the subject category.

The Impact Factor mitigates the importance of absolute citation frequencies. It tends to discount the advantage of large journals over small journals because large journals produce a larger body of citable literature. For the same reason, it tends to discount the advantage of frequently issued journals over less frequently issued ones and of older journals over newer ones. Because the journal impact factor offsets the advantages of size and age, it is a valuable tool for journal evaluation.


Impact Factor Trend Graph

The Impact Factor Trend Graph shows the Impact Factor for a five-year period. To view the graph, click the Impact Factor Trend button at the top of the Journal page.


Impact Factor Box Plot

The Impact Factor Box Plot depicts the distribution of Impact Factors for all journals in the category. More information.

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